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Everything You Need To Know About Curb Appeal


Real estate is all too often reduced to numbers, estimates and dollar signs. When we list a house, the most critical feature tends to be the price. When we compare the home to others, we try and find reasonable comparables and estimate value accordingly. We overly focus on analytics. 


You may be surprised to know, though, that real estate involves a lot of feeling. 


Some of the most reasonably priced homes still don’t sell. Owners become flustered when this happens, and buyers can’t often pinpoint why they don’t like such a home. It’s discouraging not to have good feedback! Well, it’s challenging, if not impossible, to quantify feelings. 


A prime example where feeling matters in the real estate process concerns curb appeal! Curb appeal is difficult to quantify, but very important nonetheless. This is especially true in the Okanagan! Folks move here for the lifestyle, and their home is an extension of that lifestyle. In this blog, I’ll detail why curb appeal matters to today’s buyers and give you two general areas to focus on to improve curb appeal.


Here we go!


First Impressions & The Power Of Feeling


Every buyer will view the same house differently, including the first impression upon driving up to the property. Buyers will use this initial feeling as an example of what they feel if they owned the property. They might ask the following questions, either consciously or subconsciously:


Would I take pride in owning this home?


If this were my property, what would my guests think of it when they come over to visit?


How much work will it take to make this property uniquely mine?


Does the owner take pride in this property, judging from my first impression?


As you can see, buyers can be judgemental both of themselves and your property. And they have a right to be! They’re forking out hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not more, to assume ownership of it. Sellers are wise to concern themselves with such questions. Sure, you’re not going to be able to cater to every buyer’s unique needs, wants and preferences. And there’s no such thing as the perfect curb appeal.


However, you can put yourself in the shoes of the buyer most likely to purchase your home. This is a great place to start! 


Upon identifying such buyers, map out their most likely preferences and work from there. The front of your property does not need to be fancy and upscale; it just needs to suit the tastes of those most likely to purchase it. Gaining such insight is crucial to improving your home’s curb appeal when it comes time to sell (or anytime, for that matter!)


Property Exterior

Your home’s exterior is the first place to start when deciding to improve curb appeal. Buyers will usually look at the following exterior features during their first impression:

  • Siding

  • Front door

  • Windows and window trim

  • Roof 

  • Gutters 

  • Chimney

  • General home type/shape

Pay attention to these features and the type of impression they can give to buyers; it matters! Of course, a complete replacement of all the components above can be expensive, so you need to weigh the cost, benefit and importance for each. It’s also true that some of these are merely cosmetic features, some are structural, and some are both! 


Pro Tip: Do a drive-up of your home with a friend you can trust to give you impartial advice. Upon driving up to the house, with a pen and pad ready, make a list of the things your friend notices first when it comes to your home’s curb appeal (good and bad). 


Remember, there’s no such thing as perfect curb appeal. But you do have the control to use someone impartial to help you along this journey. Consider your advisor’s views, and balance them with your own and your financial obligations for each. Keep it simple, and work outwards from there!


Landscaping

Now to the less intimidating aspect of curb appeal, landscaping! 


Landscaping can be tricky because it tends to be one of the more subjective features of any given property. However, there are some considerations to ponder when taking a good look at your front yard. Keep in mind, these all depend on the type of buyer you’re trying to attract. 


If your front yard is merely a “blank slate,” meaning it has few to no definable landscaping features, ask yourself if adding attractive features will be a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is an investor, this is likely the best option!


If your front yard has intricate networks of flowers, plants and grasses, ask yourself if simplifying it would be a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is a busy working family with limited time to spare, such investment may pay off! 


If your front yard is dominated by lush lawn, ask yourself if keeping the grass in perfect condition is a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is a young family with kids, such investment may be well worth it!


Tailor your front yard landscape to your most likely buyer. In any case, avoid quirky decor pieces and other unnecessary features to capture the broadest base of positive attention. 


Conclusion

Improving curb appeal requires you to tap into feeling, which is no easy task. It begins with an understanding of your most likely buyer and the courage to make the needed changes when possible. Then, think about how these people might feel upon discovering your property. Think about how they feel and what they value.   


In doing so, you avoid chasing unattainable perfection and work towards an effective, inviting curb appeal for your home! 


If you ever need help with your home’s curb appeal, I’m here to help! I help a wide range of buyers and sellers, getting a feel for the preferences of each. I’m more than happy to help guide you in these decisions to help give you an advantage over your selling competition.











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Declaration period to Begin for BC Speculation & Vacancy Tax ...


Here is important, time sensitive information on the completion of a declaration and registration of an exemption regarding the speculation and vacancy taxation.... click on the link below for detailed information....


Speculation & Vacancy Tax declaration - click here




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BC Home Sales Continue at Slower Pace

Vancouver, BC – December 14, 2018. The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 5,179 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) across the province in November, down 33.1 per cent from the same month last year. The average MLS® residential price in BC was $718,903, a decline of 1.9 per cent from November 2017. Total sales dollar volume was $3.7 billion, a 34.3 per cent decline from November 2017.


“BC households continue to struggle with the sharp decline in purchasing power caused by the B20 mortgage stress test,” said Cameron Muir, BCREA Chief Economist. “Most BC regions are now exhibiting relative balance between supply and demand.”

Total active residential listings were up nearly 31 per cent to 33,500 units in November, compared to the same month last year. However, it should be noted that this compares to 2017, when active listings for the month of November were at their lowest level in more than 15 years.

Year-to-date, BC residential sales dollar volume was down 23.1 per cent to $53.4 billion, compared with the same period in 2017. Residential unit sales declined 23.6 per cent to 74,847 units, while the average MLS® residential price was up 0.7 per cent to $713,302.

-30-

For more information, please contact: 

Cameron Muir  
Chief Economist  
Direct: 604.742.2780  
Mobile: 778.229.1884  
Email: cmuir@bcrea.bc.ca  

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) is the professional association for about 23,000 REALTORS® in BC, focusing on provincial issues that impact real estate. Working with the province's 11 real estate boards, BCREA provides continuing professional education, advocacy, economic research and standard forms to help REALTORS® provide value for their clients.

To demonstrate the profession's commitment to improving Quality of Life in BC communities, BCREA supports policies that help ensure economic vitality, provide housing opportunities, preserve the environment, protect property owners and build better communities with good schools and safe neighbourhoods.

For detailed statistical information, contact your local real estate board. MLS® is a cooperative marketing system used only by Canada's real estate boards to ensure maximum exposure of properties listed for sale.


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Zoning By-Law changes for cannabis

approved by Council



(December 11, 2018  ... News)

Vernon City Council has approved the changes to the Zoning Bylaw to permit cannabis sales, processing and cultivation in many of its commercial and industrial zones....


Click Here - for full story........


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RLP Downtown Realty

Disclosure of Representation in Trading Services Form

A complimentary introduction to the Real Estate Council of British Columbia's new requisite form meant to inform consumers about the types of representation they may receive from a REALTOR in a real estate transaction.


Helping You is What We Do!


Click Here -  Disclosure of Representation in Trading Services


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BC Home Sales to Rise in 2019 
BCREA 2018 Fourth Quarter Housing Forecast

Vancouver, BC – November 8, 2018. The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) released its 2018 Fourth Quarter Housing Forecast today.

Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) residential sales in the province are forecast to decline 23 per cent to 80,000 units this year, after recording 103,768 residential sales in 2017. MLS® residential sales are forecast to increase 12 per cent to 89,500 units in 2019. The 10-year average for MLS® residential sales in the province is 84,800 units.


To read the entire article -  click here..


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New Legislation makes it clear:  Farmland is for Farming.......




Legislation introduced on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018, makes it clear that land in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) is for farming and ranching in British Columbia, not for dumping construction waste or building mega-mansions.

To read the entire article, see below....


Click Here to read entire Article


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Province targets speculators and vacant homes, supports housing affordability


The British Columbia government has introduced legislation to tackle speculation in B.C.'s housing market and help turn empty properties into homes for people...


https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2018FIN0075-002014

BCREA’s Position on Drug Operations

When a property has been involved in drug production, it can pose serious health and safety risks to the public resulting from mould, chemicals thrown out in the backyard, electrical fires and invasion by criminals looking for drugs, even if the property is no longer being used for drug production. It’s important for members of the public to be informed if a property they are interested in moving into was ever identified as having a history of drug production. Unfortunately, there is no consistency across the province on how municipalities make this information available, nor is there a provincial standard of remediation for buildings used to produce drugs.


To read full article - Click Here

Everything You Need To Know About Curb Appeal


Real estate is all too often reduced to numbers, estimates and dollar signs. When we list a house, the most critical feature tends to be the price. When we compare the home to others, we try and find reasonable comparables and estimate value accordingly. We overly focus on analytics. 


You may be surprised to know, though, that real estate involves a lot of feeling. 


Some of the most reasonably priced homes still don’t sell. Owners become flustered when this happens, and buyers can’t often pinpoint why they don’t like such a home. It’s discouraging not to have good feedback! Well, it’s challenging, if not impossible, to quantify feelings. 


A prime example where feeling matters in the real estate process concerns curb appeal! Curb appeal is difficult to quantify, but very important nonetheless. This is especially true in the Okanagan! Folks move here for the lifestyle, and their home is an extension of that lifestyle. In this blog, I’ll detail why curb appeal matters to today’s buyers and give you two general areas to focus on to improve curb appeal.


Here we go!


First Impressions & The Power Of Feeling


Every buyer will view the same house differently, including the first impression upon driving up to the property. Buyers will use this initial feeling as an example of what they feel if they owned the property. They might ask the following questions, either consciously or subconsciously:


Would I take pride in owning this home?


If this were my property, what would my guests think of it when they come over to visit?


How much work will it take to make this property uniquely mine?


Does the owner take pride in this property, judging from my first impression?


As you can see, buyers can be judgemental both of themselves and your property. And they have a right to be! They’re forking out hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not more, to assume ownership of it. Sellers are wise to concern themselves with such questions. Sure, you’re not going to be able to cater to every buyer’s unique needs, wants and preferences. And there’s no such thing as the perfect curb appeal.


However, you can put yourself in the shoes of the buyer most likely to purchase your home. This is a great place to start! 


Upon identifying such buyers, map out their most likely preferences and work from there. The front of your property does not need to be fancy and upscale; it just needs to suit the tastes of those most likely to purchase it. Gaining such insight is crucial to improving your home’s curb appeal when it comes time to sell (or anytime, for that matter!)


Property Exterior

Your home’s exterior is the first place to start when deciding to improve curb appeal. Buyers will usually look at the following exterior features during their first impression:

  • Siding

  • Front door

  • Windows and window trim

  • Roof 

  • Gutters 

  • Chimney

  • General home type/shape

Pay attention to these features and the type of impression they can give to buyers; it matters! Of course, a complete replacement of all the components above can be expensive, so you need to weigh the cost, benefit and importance for each. It’s also true that some of these are merely cosmetic features, some are structural, and some are both! 


Pro Tip: Do a drive-up of your home with a friend you can trust to give you impartial advice. Upon driving up to the house, with a pen and pad ready, make a list of the things your friend notices first when it comes to your home’s curb appeal (good and bad). 


Remember, there’s no such thing as perfect curb appeal. But you do have the control to use someone impartial to help you along this journey. Consider your advisor’s views, and balance them with your own and your financial obligations for each. Keep it simple, and work outwards from there!


Landscaping

Now to the less intimidating aspect of curb appeal, landscaping! 


Landscaping can be tricky because it tends to be one of the more subjective features of any given property. However, there are some considerations to ponder when taking a good look at your front yard. Keep in mind, these all depend on the type of buyer you’re trying to attract. 


If your front yard is merely a “blank slate,” meaning it has few to no definable landscaping features, ask yourself if adding attractive features will be a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is an investor, this is likely the best option!


If your front yard has intricate networks of flowers, plants and grasses, ask yourself if simplifying it would be a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is a busy working family with limited time to spare, such investment may pay off! 


If your front yard is dominated by lush lawn, ask yourself if keeping the grass in perfect condition is a worthwhile investment. If your most likely buyer is a young family with kids, such investment may be well worth it!


Tailor your front yard landscape to your most likely buyer. In any case, avoid quirky decor pieces and other unnecessary features to capture the broadest base of positive attention. 


Conclusion

Improving curb appeal requires you to tap into feeling, which is no easy task. It begins with an understanding of your most likely buyer and the courage to make the needed changes when possible. Then, think about how these people might feel upon discovering your property. Think about how they feel and what they value.   


In doing so, you avoid chasing unattainable perfection and work towards an effective, inviting curb appeal for your home! 


If you ever need help with your home’s curb appeal, I’m here to help! I help a wide range of buyers and sellers, getting a feel for the preferences of each. I’m more than happy to help guide you in these decisions to help give you an advantage over your selling competition.











Comments:
No comments

Post Your Comment:

Housing Supply Not Keeping Pace With Demand in Most BC Regions...

 

 

Vancouver, BC – June 13, 2017. The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 12,402 residential unit sales were recorded by th

e Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in May, down 7.9 per cent from the same period last year. Total sales dollar volume was $9.33 billion, down 4.0 per cent from May 2017. The average MLS® residential price in the province was $752,536, a 4.2 per cent increase from the same period last year....

 

Click here to read entire article...

The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS®, and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are member’s of CREA. The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by CREA and identify the quality of services provided by real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.